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Claire Bishop,
2007

Claire Bishop is an art historian, critic, author, and Professor in the Art History Department at CUNY Graduate Center, New York since September 2008. Previously Bishop was an associate professor in the Department of Art History at the University of Warwick, Coventry from 2006 to 2008 and a Tutor in Critical Theory in the Curating Contemporary Art Department at the Royal College of Art, London from 2001 to 2006. She studied Art History at St John's College, Cambridge (1990-1994) and completed her MA and Ph.D at Essex University in 1996 and 2002 respectively. Bishop is editor of Participation (2006) and Installation Art: A Critical History (2005) and is a contributor to many art journals including Artforum and October; her essay “Antagonism and Relational Aesthetics,” which appeared in October in 2004, remains an influential critique of relational aesthetics. Her books have been translated into over eighteen languages. Her current research addresses the impact of digital technologies on contemporary art, as well as questions of amateurism and 'de-skilling' in contemporary dance and performance art.



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Emily Jacir,
2007

Jacir works in a variety of media including film, photography, installation, performance, video, writing and sound. She has exhibited extensively throughout the Americas, Europe, and the Middle East since 1994, holding solo exhibitions in places including New York City, Los Angeles, Ramallah, Beirut, London and Linz. Active in the building of Ramallah's art scene since 1999, Jacir has also worked with various organizations including the Qattan Foundation, al-Ma'mal Foundation and the Sakakini Cultural Center. She has been involved in creating numerous projects and events such as Birzeit's Virtual Art Gallery. She also founded and curated the first International Video Festival in Ramallah in 2002,. She curated a selection of shorts; Palestinian Revolution Cinema (1968 – 1982) which went on tour in 2007. 

Between 2000 - 2002 she curated several Arab Film programs in NYC with Alwan for the Arts including the first Palestinian Film Festival in 2002. She works as a full-time professor at the vanguard International Academy of Art Palestine since it opened its doors in 2006 and she also served on its Academic Board from 2006 through 2012. Jacir led the first year of the Ashkal Alwan Home Workspace Program in Beirut (2011-2012) and created the curriculum and programming after serving on the founding year of the Curricular Committee from 2010-2011.



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Catherine Sullivan,
2007

Catherine Sullivan (born 1968) is a Chicago-based artist whose work combines video and performance. She was educated at the California Institute of Arts and the Art Center College of Design. She is a former actor, and studied as a graduate student under Mike Kelley.[3] She currently teaches at the University of Chicago.

Five Economies (big hunt/little hunt) (2002) restages scenes from films including The Miracle Worker, Marat/Sade, Persona and Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?.'Tis Pity She's a Fluxus Whore (2003) combines filmed re-enactments of a 1953 production of John Ford's play and a 1964 Fluxus performance. Her works D-Pattern and The Chittendens were made in collaboration with the composer Sean Griffin. She won an Alpert award in 2004 and her works are held in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Tate and the Miami Art Museum.



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Emna Zghal,
2007

Emna Zghal is a Tunisian-born U.S. based visual artist. Her work was featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions in the United States, Tunisia and beyond. Zghal received fellowship residencies and done projects with: the Women’s Studio Workshop, the Newark Art Museum, the MacDowell Colony, the Weir Farm Trust, and the Cité Internationale Des Arts in Paris. Reviews of her work appeared in The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Artforum, and ARTnews, The New Yorker in addition to many Tunisian publications. Her portfolio of prints The Prophet of Black Folkabout the 9th Century African slave revolt in Iraq was acquired by Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, NY. Other works of hers are part the New York Public Library, Yale University, The Museum For African Art in New York, Grinnell College, and numerous other public and private collections in the U.S. and Tunisia. She taught at Grinnell College, Purchase College and Parsons New School of Design.



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Nayland Blake,
2007

Nayland Blake is an artist whose mixed-media work has been variously described as disturbing, provocative, elusive, tormented, sinister, hysterical, brutal, and tender. Among his most famous pieces are a log cabin made of gingerbread squares fitted to a steel frame entitled Feeder 2 (1998). When it went on display at the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, visitors furtively nibbled off bits and pieces of the cabin’s interior walls, while the smell of the gingerbread filled the gallery.

Another well-known work is Starting Over (2000), a video of the artist dancing with taps on his shoes in a bunny suit made to weigh the same as his lover, Philip Horvitz. Blake was included in the 1991 Whitney Biennial and that museum’s infamous Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary American Art exhibition in 1994. Maura Riley curated a retrospective of 30 years of Blake's art, “Behavior, which was presented in late 2008-early 2009 at Location One in New York City. His work is in the collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Walker Art Center, and the Des Moines Art Center, among others. He is represented by the Matthew Marks Gallery, and lives and works in New York City.



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Harrell Fletcher,
2007

Harrell Fletcher received his BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and his MFA from California College of the Arts. He studied organic farming at UCSC and went on to work on a variety of small Community Supported Agriculture farms, which impacted his work as an artist. Fletcher has produced a variety of socially engaged collaborative and interdisciplinary projects since the early 1990’s.

His work has been shown at SFMOMA, the de Young Museum, the Berkeley Art Museum, the Wattis Institute, and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in the San Francisco Bay Area, The Drawing Center, Socrates Sculpture Park, The Sculpture Center, The Wrong Gallery, Apex Art, and Smackmellon in NYC, DiverseWorks and Aurora Picture show in Houston, TX, PICA in Portland, OR, CoCA and The Seattle Art Museum in Seattle, WA, Signal in Malmo, Sweden, Domain de Kerguehennec in France, The Tate Modern in London, and the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia. He was a participant in the 2004 Whitney Biennial. Fletcher has work in the collections of MoMA, The Whitney Museum, The New Museum, SFMOMA, The Hammer Museum, The Berkeley Art Museum, The De Young Museum, and The FRAC Brittany, France. From 2002 to 2009 Fletcher co-produced Learning To Love You More, a participatory website with Miranda July. Fletcher is an Associate Professor of Art and Social Practice at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon.



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Faith Wilding,
2007

Faith Wilding emigrated to the United States in 1961 from Paraguay. She received her MFA at CalArts where she was a founding member of the Feminist Art Program. Wilding is a multi-disciplinary artist whose work addresses aspects of the somatic, psychic, and sociopolitical history of the body. Recent publications, lectures, exhibitions and performances focus on issues of cyberfeminist (women and technology) theory and practice, with particular emphasis on biotechnology. Wilding has exhibited and lectured widely in the USA and Europe. Her audio work has been commissioned and broadcast by RIAS Berlin; WDR Cologne; and National Public Radio, USA. Wilding has published in MEANING, Heresies, Ms. Magazine, The Power of Feminist Art, and other books and magazines. She is the recipient of two individual media grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. Currently, Wilding is a faculty member at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the MFA in Visual Art Program at Vermont College of the Union Institute and University.



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Anoka Farquee,
2007

Anoka Faruqee (b. 1972, Ann Arbor) earned her M.F.A. from the Tyler School of Art in 1997 and her B.A., Painting from Yale University in 1994. Faruqee is an alumna of the Whitney Independent Study Program, and residencies at the Skowhegan School of Art and the PS1 National Studio Program. Her grants include the Pollock Krasner Foundation and Artadia. Currently, Faruqee is director of graduate studies in painting/printmaking at Yale School of Art, and has previously held positions at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Cal Arts, where she was Co-Director of the ArtProgram.

Faruqee’s work has been exhibited in the US and abroad at venues including: MoMA/PS1, Queens, NY; Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Schneider Museum of Art, Ashland, OR; and Björkholmen Gallery, Stockholm, among others. Faruqee recently curated the major exhibition Search Versus Re-Search: Josef Albers, Artist and Educator, and directed a short film about Albers’ art and teaching, for the Yale School of Art 32 Edgewood Gallery. She is represented by Koenig & Clinton gallery in New York, and Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. Faruqee lives and works in New Haven, CT.



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Takao Kawaguchi,
2007

Takao Kawaguchi is a performer who uses his body as his sole medium in collaborations with artists like Fuyuki Yamakawa, known for his creations that utilize medical equipment to isolate bodily functions like the beat of the heart and synchronize them with sound, light and video images in unique forms of expression, and Atsuhiro Ito, who uses a device called “optron” that amplifies the electronic noise of florescent light tubes to create powerful displays of light and sound. In this interview we talk with Kawaguchi about his artistic activities, which include his work as a current member of the legendary 1990s performance/artist group “dumb type.”



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The Speculative Archive,
2007

The Speculative Archive produces videos, photographs, installations, and published texts. From 1999 to 2003, Archive projects centered on state secrecy and the production of the past. Current works address the use of documents—images, texts, objects, bodies, and physical structures—to project and claim visions of the future. The Archive is a collaboration of Los Angeles-based artists Julia Meltzer and David Thorne. Recent projects have been exhibited in the 2006 California Biennial (Orange County Museum of Art), Gallery Akbank Sanat (Istanbul), Kunstmuseum Goteborg (Sweden), Palazzo de la Papesse, (Siena, Italy), Apex Art (New York), Momenta (New York), the Hayward Gallery’s (London) travelling exhibition program, Whitechapel Gallery (London), the Oberhausen Short Film Festival (Germany), the International Film Festival Rotterdam, the New York Video Festival, the Margaret Mead Film Festival, and the Toronto International Film Festival, among others.



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