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Virgil Marti,
2005

Virgil Marti creates hybrid objects and environments informed by a wide range of art-historical and pop-cultural references. Known for inserting high décor into fine art contexts, his installations are rich in humor, and shrewd observation. After attending Skowhegan in 1990, he worked for many years as a master printer and project coordinator at The Fabric Workshop and Museum. His work was included in the The Jewel Thief at The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum (2010), La Biennale de Montréal (2007), Whitney Biennial 2004, and Apocalyptic Wallpaper at the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio (1997). Recent collaborative projects and solo shows include Set Pieces at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia (2010), Ah! Sunflower at the Visual Art Center, Richmond, VA (2008), and Directions: Virgil Marti/Pae White at the Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C. (2007). 



VIRGIL MARTI, “FIVE STANDARDS (DAZZLE)”, 2013,
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VIRGIL MARTI, “LOOKING GLASSES”, 2013,
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VIRGIL MARTI, “PILLS”, 1999,
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Gareth James,
2005

Gareth James works at the intersection of theory and practice in the form of objects, images, writing, and pedagogy. His work often reacts to ideas of economy and production, while also displaying humor and inventiveness in outcomes that deal with the objective nature of art. Gareth is a co-founder of the Scorched Earth publication and was one of the founding members of the cooperatively organized Orchard Gallery. He currently teaches at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. 

James’s work is constituted through his abiding interest in histories of iconoclasm in which the social divisions and inequities that mark and delimit artistic practice are registered most emphatically. In James’ practice as an artist and as a writer, conventional aesthetic discourse is lost and rediscovered in neighboring fields such as topology or psychoanalysis; capitalist property relations are seen to exert as much determinative force on the visual field as phenomenological bodies; and theoretical materials are indistinct from physical ones in an incipient philosophy of materials. In his teaching, James incorporates a wide base of theoretical paradigms and experimental methodologies in order to examine the fullest extension of the field of art.



GARETH JAMES, “1., 2., 3., 4.”, 2008,
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GARETH JAMES, “1.”, 2008,
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GARETH JAMES, “SPIRAL BIND – THE HISTORY AND USES OF CHROME AND THE DISCOVERY OF THE NEW, THE HIDDEN, THE STRANGE.”, 2008,
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GARETH JAMES, “BRITTLE MATERIALS FAIL IN TENSION. CRACKS PROPAGATE WHEN THEY ARE PULLED OPEN...”, 2008,
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Pamela Fraser,
2005

Pamela Fraser works experimentally in a variety of materials and formats, primarily engaged with painting. Her work often explores the language of abstraction, and the relationship of abstraction to place. When do abstract shapes and forms convey meaning(s), and when do they disintegrate into illegibility? What happens when they are placed in contexts alien to customary reception? Fraser has made and exhibited work for 20 years. Past solo exhibitions include at Galerie Schmidt Maczolleck in Cologne, Germany; Galleria Il Capricorno in Venice, Italy; asprey jacques in London, England; Casey Kaplan in New York, NY; and The Blaffer Museum in Houston, TX.

Select group exhibitions include galleries and institutions such as GAD in Oslo, Norway; The Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, NY; Wurttembergischer Kunstverein in Stuttgart, Germany; Dundee Center of Contemporary Art in Scotland; and The Crayon Miscellany, at Art Omi in Ghent, NY. Fraser lives in Barnard, Vermont, and is a professor at The University of Vermont. In addition to her studio practice, she writes about art and organizes exhibitions. Her book How Color Works: Color Theory in the 21st Century will be published by Oxford University Press in 2017.

 



PAMELA FRASER, “SMITH HILL”, 2015,
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PAMELA FRASER, “UNTITLED (INSTALLATION)”, 2010,
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PAMELA FRASER, “UNTITLED (WITH TRAILS)”, 2009,
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Ken Fandell,
2005

Through photography and video Ken Fandell “examines the breakdown of thought, language, representation, and inspiration. Through his investigations Fandell has discovered a peculiar place containing both humor and earnestness, between rigorous investigation and sweet sentimentality, encompassing heroic triumph and tragic defeat.” In 2005 he had solo exhibitions at Chicago's Bodybuilder & Sportsman and the Howard House in Seattle. Currently he is Assistant Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.



KEN FANDELL, “162 SKIES”, 2005,
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KEN FANDELL, “EVERMORE”, 2008,
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KEN FANDELL, “LASER 62”, 2012,
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Patty Cheng,
2005

Patty Chang is an American film director and performance artist living in New York. Her performative works deal with themes of gender, language and empathy. She was described as "one of our most consistently exciting young artists" by The New York Times in 2006. Originally trained as a painter, she is primarily known for her short films and videos and her performance art. She often plays a central role in her own work (to the point that a New York Times critic once described it as "hair-raisingly narcissistic"), which is often seen as testing the acceptable boundaries of taste and endurance. Some of her work contains scatological elements (such as Gong Li With The Wind, a short film), and others critique perceptions of female sexual roles (For Paradise, also a short film). She has staged solo shows in major cities such as Madrid at the Museo National de Reina Sofia in 2000, in Visby at the Baltic Art Center in 2001, in Los Angeles at the Hammer Museum in 2005, in New York at the Jack Tilton Gallery in 1999 and at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in 2005.



PATTY CHENG, “IN LOVE”, 2001,
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PATTY CHENG, “MELONS AT A LOSS”, 1998,
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PATTY CHENG, “SHANGRI-LA”, 2006,
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Paul Chan,
2005

Paul Chan is an American artist, writer and publisher. His single channel videos, projections, animations and multimedia projects are influenced by outsider artists, playwrights, and philosophers such as Henry Darger, Samuel Beckett, Theodor W. Adorno, and Marquis de Sade. Paul Chan’s work concerns topics including geopolitics, globalization, and their responding political climates, war documentation, violence, deviance, and pornography, language, and new media. Chan has exhibited his work at the Venice Biennale, the Whitney Biennial, documenta, the Serpentine Gallery, the Museum of Modern Art, the New Museum, and other institutions. Chan has also engaged in a variety of publishing projects, and, in 2010, founded the art and ebook publishing company Badlands Unlimited, based in New York. Chan’s essays and interviews have appeared in Artforum, Frieze, Flash Art, October, Tate, Parkett, Texte Zur Kunst, Bomb, and other magazines and journals.



PAUL CHAN, “MY BIRDS . . . TRASH . . . THE FUTURE“, 2004
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PAUL CHAN, “NONPROJECTIONS FOR NEW LOVERS“, 2014
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PAUL CHAN, “SELECTED WORKS
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Mequitta Ahuja,
2005

Mequitta Ahuja is a contemporary American painter of African American and Asian Indian descent who resides in Baltimore, Maryland. To create her paintings, Ahuja relies on a three-step process that involves performance, photography, and drawing/painting. Ahuja begins by developing a series of performances involving costumes, props, and poses. With the aid of a remote shutter, she then photographs her performances and documents them as "non-fictional source material." Finally, she incorporates these photographs into her invented material, resulting in her completed self-portraits. In 2007, Ahuja was included in the exhibition Global Feminisms at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, and in 2009 her painting Dream Region was featured as the cover of the book War Baby/Love Child: Mixed Race Asian American Art in which the artist was featured. Her work has been exhibited throughout the United States as well as in Paris, Brussels, Berlin, India and Dubai, and she has been the recipient of multiple awards for her art, including the Tiffany Foundation Award in 2007, a 2009 Joan Mitchell Award, and a 2008 Houston Artadia Prize. 



MEQUITTA AHUJA, 'FINGERING VANITAS', 2015
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MEQUITTA AHUJA, 'KITE', 2013
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MEQUITTA AHUJA, 'SEESAW', 2014
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Amy Adler,
2005

Amy Adler was born and raised in New York City. She graduated from Cooper Union and received an MFA in Visual Art from UCLA and an MFA in Cinematic Arts from USC. She has had one person shows at the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and The Aspen Art Museum as well as galleries worldwide. Her project, Amy Adler Photographs Leonardo DiCaprio, was shown at the UCLA Hammer Museum in Los Angeles in 2002. In the spring of 2005 Twin Palms Press released a monograph of her work entitled, Amy Adler Young Photographer. Adler’s work is included in several permanent collections including The Broad Foundation, Los Angeles, The UCLA Hammer Museum, Los Angeles and The Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles. Amy Adler currently lives in Los Angeles and is Professor of Visual Art at the University of California San Diego.



AMY ADLER, “THE PROBLEM CHILD”, 1995,
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AMY ADDLER, “CENTERFOLD (BLACK WITH CAT)”, 2001,
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AMY ADDLER, “LOCATION (PLAYGROUND NO.4)”, 2014,
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OUt of Sight,
2006

OUT OF SIGHT was a Conference on the Abolition of Slavery 1807–2007, organized by Professors Huey Copeland and Krista Thomson and sponsored by the Departments of Art History and African American Studies, Northwestern University. Presenting artists include Fred Wilson (keynote speaker), Keith Piper, Hank Willis Thomas and Chris Cozier. The conference addresses the inherent difficulties involved in crafting a visual language capable of representing slavery, abolition, and emancipation—experiences that numerous thinkers have described as unrepresentable, visual blind spots in the memory of the African diaspora.



Mendi and Keith Obadike,

Mendi + Keith Obadike make music, art and literature. Their works include The Sour Thunder, an Internet opera (Bridge Records), Crosstalk: American Speech Music (Bridge Records), Black.Net.Art Actions, a suite of new media artworks (published in re:skin on M.I.T Press), Big House / Disclosure, a 200 hour public sound installation (Northwestern University), Phonotype, a book & CD of media artworks, and a poetry collection, Armor and Flesh (Lotus Press). They have contributed sounds/music to projects by wide range of artists including loops for soul singer D'Angelo's first album and a score for playwright Anna Deavere Smith at the Lincoln Center Institute. They were invited to develop their first "opera-masquerade" by writer Toni Morrison at her Princeton Atelier. Their other honors include a Rockefeller New Media Arts Fellowship, Pick Laudati Award for Digital Art, a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Fiction, and a Vectors Fellowship from USC. Their intermedia work has been commissioned by The NY African Film Festival and Electronic Arts Intermix, The Yale Cabaret, Whitechapel Art Gallery (London), and The Whitney Museum of Art, among other institutions. Their music has been featured on New York and Chicago public radio, as well as on Juniradio (104.5) in Berlin. 



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